What Every Pregnant Woman Needs to Know About Blood Clots

Image from WebMD

Image from WebMD

Blood clots are sneaky, deadly and unfortunately occur more frequently in pregnant women – especially after they have had a baby. In a non-pregnant woman, blood clots are good because they keep us from bleeding to death after we cut our finger or scrape our knees. However during pregnancy, the body produces many blood clots (a condition known as hypercoaguability) which increase the risk of having a stroke, blood clots in the leg (deep venous thrombosis, aka DVT) which could travel to the lungs and cause death. Pregnant women are five times more likely to develop a blood clot than a non-pregnant woman and there is a greater chance that this will occur after the baby is born as opposed to before.
Who is at risk for developing blood clots during pregnancy?

• Women who are born with genetic disorders that increase the risk of blood clots (known as thrombophilia)
• Women who have had greater than 5 children
• Women who have c/sections
• Women who smoke
• Women who are obese
• Women who have had a previous blood clot
• Women who have had injuries that require them to wear a cast while pregnant
• Women who have cancer
• Women who are greater than age 30

A recent article in The New England Journal of Medicine had shed new light on this problem. It was known that pregnant women have an increased chance of having a blood clot for approximately six weeks after delivering a baby. However, a medical study of over 1.6 million women demonstrated that an increased risk of developing a blood clot can occur up to 12 weeks after the baby is born rather than six weeks. The greater risk for developing a blood clot occurs at approximately 3 weeks after having a baby but that risk might continue up until 12 weeks.

Based on this new knowledge, post partum patients at risk for blood clots must wear compression stockings and take blood thinners for approximately 12 weeks as opposed to 6 weeks. Although you healthcare provider is aware of these new changes, you should too.

Remember, a healthy pregnancy doesn’t just happen. It takes a smart mother who knows what to do.

What Pregnant Women Need to Know About 5,797 Work-Related Complaints

Walmart pregnancy case

The Washington Post recently published a story about mammoth retailer Wal-mart’s new policy that allows pregnant women more options so that they can continue to work even late into their pregnancy. While this change of policy is a moral and economic victory for pregnant Wal-mart employees, it did not come without a fight.

In 2011, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission received 5,797 pregnancy-related complaints from women who represented all walks of life from a cashier to corporate executives who felt that they were discriminated against by their employers solely on the grounds of being pregnant. According to the National Women’s Law Center, almost 9 out of 10 women worked into their last two months of pregnancy which carries an increased risk of complications. Rather than allow the pregnant employees to change positions, work less hours or sit in a chair, many find themselves terminated or asked to take a temporary leave of absence that often times becomes permanent. Many are forced to use their Family Medical Leave time before having the baby and must rush back because they’ve run out of time.

Tiffany Beroid’s blood pressure started to rise as her pregnancy advanced. Her doctor gave her a light duty note but Wal-Mart told her they didn’t have light duty work, forcing her to take her pregnancy leave sooner than anticipated. Through social media efforts, pregnant employees of Wal-Mart with problems similar to Beroid’s began networking and an organization called Our Wal-Mart that is a labor union supported group began to advocate on Beroid’s behalf. She was also assisted by a work advocacy group called A Better Balance as well as the National Women’s Law Center.

March 5, 2014 became a day of victory for the thousands of pregnant employees of Wal-Mart when the company issued a new policy that allows its pregnant employees to perform less demanding work if they’re having difficulty fulfilling their duties.

All pregnant women are encouraged to become familiar with The Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978 in order to protect their rights. The policy changes of Wal-Mart are to be commended. Let’s hope other industries will follow suit.

Is Underwater Childbirth Safe? Some Doctors Say No.

Compliments of Health Day News

Compliments of Health Day News

Most women look forward to having a baby but no one wants to feel pain. In recent years, having a baby in a pool of water has become a popular trend because it allegedly reduces the need for pain meds and anesthesia however not so fast, says both obstetricians and pediatricians. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) have issued a formal opinion (Committee Opinion #594 April 2014) that does not support “immersion” (aka underwater) births because of its associated complications while a mother is pushing to deliver her baby. The “pushing” part of childbirth is also known as “second stage labor.”
Why is this important? Because there are presently 143 birthing centers in the U.S. that offer underwater births to pregnant women. In fact, 1% of all births in the United Kingdom are immersion. While some research claims that these births are safe, experts think otherwise and state that the number of women studied was too small to detect rare but potentially harmful outcomes.
While some women may experience a feeling of well being and control, decreased stress and less vaginal tears during an immersion birth, according to the Committee Opinion, there is no scientific evidence that an underwater or immersion birth helps the baby. In fact, there is evidence of increased complications such as
• increased infections to both the mother and newborn, especially after the membranes are ruptured (aka “water broke”)
• difficulty in regulated the newborn’s temperature
• increased risk of the umbilical cord tearing from the placenta
• infant drowning and near drowning
• infant seizures and suffocation
• severe infant breathing problems
Should women give up immersion births completely? Probably not. The experts think that a woman may stay in these tubs during labor but should NOT push or deliver the baby underwater. They also recommend stricter protocols, patient selection and infection control.
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