In Praise of Elizabeth Edwards, Champion of Healthcare Reform

Image by http://www.ksvoboda.com

The day Elizabeth Edwards announced that she had breast cancer, my heart sank. Finding a lump in the breast only heightens the suspicion that the prognosis may not be good. In Elizabeth’s case, it wasn’t. We all admired Elizabeth for different reasons. In my case, it was her love for healthcare reform that quickly grabbed my attention and we were both older moms of two small children. Elizabeth advocated universal healthcare and comprehensive insurance for all Americans, not a “compromised” version based on partisanship and politics. As the years wore on, she discussed her diagnosis of incurable breast cancer with passion stating that she knew that she had access to the best possible care but empathized with women who were not as fortunate.

It is said that behind every successful man lies the power behind the throne and we know this to be true about Elizabeth. She was an accomplished attorney in her own right who took a back seat to raise her kids and support the presidential candidacy of her husband. For a while I thought Elizabeth had won the battle against breast cancer during its remission but then it resurfaced its ugly head in the midst of her husband’s presidential campaign.  She handled it with both dignity and grace. We collectively winced when she faced the infamous scandal that violated principal and moral authority and embraced her even more. The last years of her life were a celebration of uncertainty as she became more and more vocal about healthcare reform. As recent as last night, members of our healthcare advocacy group, Doctors For America, discussed sending Elizabeth a letter of gratitude for all of her efforts regarding healthcare reform. Alas, we were too late. She made her transition this morning.

Elizabeth might have lost the battle with cancer, but she certainly mastered the art of living. In her own words she explained “I have found that in the simple act of living with hope, and in the daily effort to have a positive impact in the world, the days I do have are made all the more meaningful and precious. And for that I am grateful.”

We’re grateful, too, Elizabeth.  Very grateful.

In Praise of Elizabeth Edwards, Champion of Healthcare Reform

Image by http://www.ksvoboda.com

The day Elizabeth Edwards announced that she had breast cancer, my heart sank. Finding a lump in the breast only heightens the suspicious that the prognosis may not be good and in Elizabeth’s case, it wasn’t. We all admired Elizabeth for different reasons. In my case, it was her love for healthcare reform that quickly grabbed my attention. Elizabeth advocated universal healthcare and comprehensive insurance for all Americans, not a “compromised” version based on partisanship and politics. As the years wore on, she discussed her diagnosis of incurable breast cancer with passion stating that she knew that she had access to the best possible care but empathized with women who were not as fortunate.

It is said that behind every successful man lies the power behind the throne and we know this to be true about Elizabeth. She was an accomplished attorney in her own right who took a back seat to raise her kids and support the presidential candidacy of her husband. For a while I thought Elizabeth had won the battle against breast cancer during its remission but then it resurfaced its ugly head in the midst of her husband’s presidential campaign and she handled it with dignity and grace. We all winced when she faced the infamous scandal that violated principal and moral authority and embraced her even more. The last years of her life were a celebration of uncertainty as she became more and more vocal about healthcare reform. As recent as last night, members of our healthcare advocacy group, Doctors For America, discussed sending Elizabeth a letter of gratitude for all of her efforts regarding healthcare reform. Alas, we were too late. She made her transition this morning.

Elizabeth might have lost the battle with cancer, but she certainly mastered the art of living. In her own words she explained “I have found that in the simple act of living with hope, and in the daily effort to have a positive impact in the world, the days I do have are made all the more meaningful and precious. And for that I am grateful.”

We’re grateful, too, Elizabeth.  Very grateful.

Will Americans Die Because They Are Poor?

“Let them eat cake” was the response uttered by a French aristocrat upon learning that her impoverished citizens did not have bread to eat. The US State Medicaid offices have essentially said the same thing. (See US States Slash Medicaid by Tom Eley) If the proposed Medicaid cuts are enacted, being poor will become equivalent to having a death sentence in one of the most prosperous countries in the world.  Don’t believe it? A 76-year old woman in Michigan died from dental abscesses in Michigan when her dental coverage was revoked.

If you’re poor and need eye services? Forget about it. Live in Arizona and have children in the CHIP program? It might very well disappear. Have mental health problems and live in poverty? You might not be treated.  Pregnant and live in California? You’ll have to be poorer than dirt in order to receive insurance. Your doctors’ Medicaid and Medicare payments have been slashed severely so very few will be able to treat you. No one wants to work for free. Are you incontinent with urine? Sorry, no more adult diapers. If you live in Tennessee, please don’t have a car accident or heart attack. Your state is only going to pay a lifetime Medicaid benefit of $10,000 for inpatient care.

If state legislators need money to fund our healthcare system why don’t they start by commandeering the obscene salaries and fiscal perks of insurance CEOs? Make the lobbyists empty their deep pockets. Raid the trust funds of spoiled brats who never did an honest day’s work in their lives.  Empty the bank vaults in the Cayman Island and bring home all of that tax-free money. Tell the oil barons in Dubai to stop milking us dry. How about manufacturing something “Made in the US” for a change?

Billy Graham once said “Hot heads and cold hearts never solved anything.” Performing slash-and-burn maneuvers will NOT eliminate our healthcare’s fiscal problems. The poor are sick and the sick are poor.  Please do not increase their numbers.